Tile section of a mihrab

* Nearly 20,000 images of artworks the museum believes to be in the public domain are available to download on this site. Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. By using any of these images you agree to LACMA's Terms of Use.

Tile section of a mihrab

Iran, Kashan, early 14th century
Ceramics
Fritware, overglaze luster-painted, with cobalt and turquoise
overall: 40 1/2 x 46 7/8 in. (102.87 x 119.0625 cm) unspecified (unspecified): 40 1/2 x 46 7/8 in. (102.87 x 119.06 cm) Weight: 270 lb. (122.5 kg)
The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection, gift of Joan Palevsky (M.73.5.1)
Not currently on public view

Curator Notes

A mihrab is a characteristic architectural element in mosques and other places where Muslims worship. It serves to emphasize the direction of Mecca, toward which all prayer is oriented....
A mihrab is a characteristic architectural element in mosques and other places where Muslims worship. It serves to emphasize the direction of Mecca, toward which all prayer is oriented. Shaped like a niche, the mihrab is usually concave, but flat examples also occur, as here. This mihrab, which represents only the upper central panel of what was undoubtedly a larger ensemble, is inscribed with a passage from the Qur'an (15:45–47) that refers to Paradise, suggesting that it may have once graced a funerary monument.
More...

Bibliography

  • Lo Terrenal y lo Divino: Arte Islámico siglos VII al XIX Colección del Museo de Arte del Condado de Los Ángeles. Santiago: Centro Cultural La Moneda, 2015.

  • Donahue, Kenneth. Los Angeles County Museum of Art Handbook. Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1977.
  • Lo Terrenal y lo Divino: Arte Islámico siglos VII al XIX Colección del Museo de Arte del Condado de Los Ángeles. Santiago: Centro Cultural La Moneda, 2015.

  • Donahue, Kenneth. Los Angeles County Museum of Art Handbook. Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1977.
  • Komaroff, Linda.  Islamic Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  Los Angeles:  Museum Associates, 2005.
  • Egyptian, Roman, Western Asiatic & Islamic, Indian and Cambodian Antiquities: the Property of the Kevorkian Foundation. New York: Parke-Bernet Galleries, 1970.
More...