Haniwa Horse

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Haniwa Horse

Japan, 6th century A.D.
Sculpture
Earthenware
47 3/4 x 45 3/4 x 16 1/4 in. (121.29 x 116.21 x 41.28 cm)
Gift of the David Bohnett Foundation, Lynda and Stewart Resnick, Camilla Chandler Frost, Victoria Jackson and William Guthy, and Laurie and Bill Benenson (M.2008.102)
Currently on public view:
Pavilion for Japanese Art, floor 3 MAP IT
Pavilion for Japanese Art, floor 3

Since gallery displays may change often, please contact us before you visit to make certain this item is on view.

History

This type of sculpture is called a haniwa, meaning "clay ring". Haniwa were placed on top of tombs for the wealthy elite in Japan from 300 to 600 AD....
This type of sculpture is called a haniwa, meaning "clay ring". Haniwa were placed on top of tombs for the wealthy elite in Japan from 300 to 600 AD. There are many surviving examples of haniwa, but this horse is extraordinarily tall, at four feet.

When the museum acquired the piece, extensive testing took place to make sure that it was authentic. To hear conservator John Hirx explain the thermoluminescence testing process, press the audio play button below.

More...

Bibliography

  • Mintz, Robert. 2014. Japanese Ceramics for the Twenty-first century: the Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection. Baltimore, Maryland: the Walters Art Museum.