Virgin of Guadalupe (Virgen de Guadalupe)

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Virgin of Guadalupe (Virgen de Guadalupe)

circa 1720
Paintings
Oil on canvas
81 1/2 × 55 1/8 × 1 3/16 in. (207 × 140 × 3 cm) Frame: 89 × 62 1/2 × 2 1/2 in. (226.06 × 158.75 × 6.35 cm)
Gift of Kelvin Davis through the 2014 Collectors Committee (M.2014.91)
Not currently on public view

Curator Notes

Legend has it that in 1531, the Virgin appeared to the Indian Juan Diego and asked him to visit Bishop Juan de Zumárraga so he could build her a chapel at the hill of Tepeyac, north of Mexico City....
Legend has it that in 1531, the Virgin appeared to the Indian Juan Diego and asked him to visit Bishop Juan de Zumárraga so he could build her a chapel at the hill of Tepeyac, north of Mexico City. At first, the bishop refused to believe Juan Diego, until he unfolded his cloak filled with extraordinary flowers, revealing the miraculously imprinted image of the Virgin. Although the cult of the Virgin of Guadalupe goes back to the second half of the sixteenth century, her tradition was fixed a century later. In this version by Antonio de Torres, one of the best painters of the early eighteenth century in Mexico, the Virgin is depicted surrounded by four roundels illustrating her various apparitions to Juan Diego. The larger roundel at her feet depicts her new sanctuary (completed in 1709) at the hill of Tepeyac.

- Ilona Katzew, 2014
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