Empress Jingū and Takeuchi no Sukune Fishing at Chikuzen

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Empress Jingū and Takeuchi no Sukune Fishing at Chikuzen

Alternate Title: 神巧皇后 竹内宿禰
Series: A Mirror of Great Warriors of Japan
Japan, circa 1876
Prints; woodblocks
Color woodblock print
Image: 12 3/4 × 8 5/16 in. (32.39 × 21.11 cm) Sheet: 14 1/8 × 9 7/8 in. (35.88 × 25.08 cm)
Herbert R. Cole Collection (M.84.31.260)
Not currently on public view

About The Era

The spirit of the Japanese warrior has its roots in Japans classical myths from as early as the 4th century....
The spirit of the Japanese warrior has its roots in Japans classical myths from as early as the 4th century. These tales featured characters of profound physical strength with a quick mind and fierce sense of dedication to the emperor or ruling clan. These prototypical warriors had impressive pedigrees, often linking them to Chinese royalty or even gods, and their ambitions and feats often exceeded the expectations of their forebears. While many of these characters can be seen as examples of extraordinary achievement and talent at an individual level, they are also celebrated for their selfless devotion to their families, clans, and masters. A number of warrior legends from this period involve an aggressive expulsion of rebels and barbarians from what was considered imperial land in an attempt to maintain the integrity of the ruling clan against external threats. During this era, Japanese notions of a tragic hero, or “loser-hero,” were created, an archetype defined as a warrior who suffers an inglorious death or defeat after a life spent winning and completing noble deeds.
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