American Indian Ceramics

American Indian Ceramics
7 records
This group of ten American Indian ceramic vessels spans the nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries and comprises the best of Zuni, Acoma, Tesuque, Zia, Kiua and Hopi traditions. Collected by longtime LACMA supporter and trustee Camilla Chandler Frost, this rare group of Pueblo pottery is the first of its kind to enter LACMA’s collection and dramatically expands the range of objects for display in the Art of the Americas galleries. In addition to the technical virtuosity involved in forming large, thin walled vessels without a wheel, the painted decoration of these pieces is stunning. The Kiua jar is a superb example of the Cochiti Pueblo with its distinctive cream slip and graphic black painted designs. The bird motif of the Zia pictorial jar is characteristic of the well known work of Reyes Galvan Aguilar, especially the style of the “Zia bird.” The Acomita water jar is exceptional for its age, the Kiapkwa water jar for its painted faces, and the Zia storage jar for its sheer size. The Sikyatki Revival Jar displays the dynamic geometric designs characteristic of the style. Sikyatki, which means “Yellow House” in the Hopi language, is a former Hopi village, inhabited from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century. A Smithsonian Institution excavation of the site in 1895 yielded many well preserved pottery shards, which inspired the ceramist Iris Nampeyo. She reintroduced and reinterpreted the pre-Hispanic designs, sparking the Sikyatki revival in polychrome pottery. Nampeyo and Maria Martinez, whose work is also represented in LACMA’s collections, are two of the best known female American Indian ceramists of the early twentieth-century. Elizabeth Williams, Assistant Curator Decorative Arts and Design, 2009