Wadjet: Vulture, Snake

Wadjet: Vulture, Snake
2 records
Wadjet: goddess of Lower Egypt (Vulture, Snake)

The cobra goddess Wadjet, a daughter of the sun god Re, was the patron deity of the Nile Delta. Her name means “the green one,” perhaps a reference to the green Delta area. Wadjet, along with the Upper Egyptian vulture goddess Nekhbet, was a goddess linked closely with the kingship. Together, Wadjet and Nekhbet were known as the “Two Ladies” and were protective goddesses of the king. Wadjet, as “mistress of fear,” spit fire at the enemies of the king of Egypt and was represented on the king’s brow in the form of the uraeus.

Most often Wadjet was represented as a cobra, reared back with hood extended, ready to strike. This is the form seen on the brows of kings throughout ancient Egyptian depictions of royalty. She is also seen in this form with the solar disk, offering her protection to the sun god. Due to her close relationship with Nekhbet, Wadjet was also depicted sometimes as a vulture with the head of a snake, or as a snake with wings. As the daughter of Re, she was shown in the form of a lioness, or as a woman with the head of a lioness.