Scotland

Scotland
5 records
The Arts and Crafts movement in Scotland was very different from that in England; it was less devoted to handwork and almost exclusively urban. As the most European of British cities, Glasgow was more receptive to the continental Art Nouveau style, with its characteristic symbolic imagery and curvilinear aesthetic. But it also had much in common with England: many analogous associations flourished, such as the Scottish Guild of Handicraft and the Scottish Society of Art Workers. Like the English, the Scots had an affinity for design unity, native motifs (with an emphasis on the Celtic), and the ideal of the domestic vernacular.

What Glasgow shared most with design reform in English cities was the influence of the new art schools. In this gallery, all the Glaswegian designers were directly affiliated, either as students or teachers, with the Glasgow School of Art. The Arts and Crafts movements of Glasgow and Edinburgh (the other important art center in Scotland) reflected the tension between Scottish and British national identity; Scotland was a product of three centuries of subordinate partnership in the political union that comprised Great Britain. Architects such as Robert Lorimer built medieval-inspired tower houses and designed furniture that celebrated the period before 1603, when Scotland was an independent kingdom and Edinburgh was its capital.

- Wendy Kaplan (2005)