Messengers in the Wind (Mensajeras en el viento)

* Nearly 20,000 images of artworks the museum believes to be in the public domain are available to download on this site. Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. By using any of these images you agree to LACMA's Terms of Use.

Messengers in the Wind (Mensajeras en el viento)

Alternate Title: Mensajeras en el viento
Mexico, 1931
Paintings
Oil on canvas
31 x 34 in. (78.7 x 86.4 cm)
The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art (AC1997.LWN.36)
Currently on public view:
Art of the Americas Building, floor 4 MAP IT
Art of the Americas Building, floor 4

Since gallery displays may change often, please contact us before you visit to make certain this item is on view.

Curator Notes

During the 1920s and 1930s, a number of artists in Mexico depicted the technology of the city to emphasize its modernity....
During the 1920s and 1930s, a number of artists in Mexico depicted the technology of the city to emphasize its modernity. In Messengers in the Wind (Mensajeras en el viento), two native women dressed in white fly across an urban nocturnal sky; their speed is reinforced by the trajectory of the electric wires. Born in Oaxaca, Rufino Tamayo lived and worked in Mexico City, traveling frequently to New York. In the 1920s, he became increasingly interested in folk art and themes of everyday life. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Tamayo believed that art should have an aesthetic, rather than an ideological, function.

Ilona Katzew, 2008
More...

Bibliography

  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  New York: Thames and Hudson, 2003.