Too Khali (Void)

* Nearly 20,000 images of artworks the museum believes to be in the public domain are available to download on this site. Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. By using any of these images you agree to LACMA's Terms of Use.

Too Khali (Void)

Iran, Tehran, 2011
Installation Art
Inkjet prints, neon
.1) Image: 43 1/4 × 43 1/4 in. (109.86 × 109.86 cm) .1) Sheet: 44 × 44 3/8 in. (111.76 × 112.71 cm) .2) Image: 43 1/4 × 43 1/2 in. (109.86 × 110.49 cm) .2) Sheet: 44 1/4 × 44 3/4 in. (112.4 × 113.67 cm) .3a) Neon sign: 20 × 25 3/4 × 1 1/2 in. (50.8 × 65.41 × 3.81 cm) .3b) Neon sign: 17 × 18 × 1 1/4 in. (43.18 × 45.72 × 3.18 cm)
Purchased with funds provided by Art of the Middle East: Contemporary (M.2013.161.1-.3)
Currently on public view:
Ahmanson Building, floor 4 MAP IT
Ahmanson Building, floor 4

Since gallery displays may change often, please contact us before you visit to make certain this item is on view.

Curator Notes

In this three-part piece, Arash Hanaei takes on the messaging of the garishly colored neon signage that

...

In this three-part piece, Arash Hanaei takes on the messaging of the garishly colored neon signage that marks the cityscape of Tehran, his home. Each section of the work repeats the colloquial Persian expression Too Khali, which means empty or void. It is a conscious reference and homage to the work of Parviz Tanavoli, one of Iran’s greatest modern sculptors, who is best known for his imaginative three-dimensional renderings of the Persian word heech, or nothingness. Tanavoli not only helped to define the artistic generation leading up to the 1979 Islamic Revolution but has continued to inspire postrevolutionary artists like Hanaei.

Arash Hanaei has participated in solo and group shows since 2002, when he received a BA in photography from Azad University of Art, Tehran. Included in the groundbreaking 2009 exhibition Iran Inside Out at New York’s Chelsea Museum, his work has also been shown at Art Dubai and Paris Photo. He currently divides his time between Tehran and Paris.

More...